#Surveillancve #TargetedIndividuals #Facebook, Google’s CEO’s Three Biggest Flubs Before Congress #Treason #ConstitutionalCrisis

swodinsky Facebook, Google’s CEO’s Three Biggest Flubs Before Congress:  https://gizmodo.com/the-three-biggest-lies-google-and-facebook-spouted-abou-1844557693

Shoshana Wodinsky7/31/20

The Three Biggest Lies Google and Facebook Spouted About Your Privacy Before Congress

Photo: Mandel Ngan (Getty Images)The landmark antitrust hearing earlier this week had a little bit of everything: tantrums over mandated masks, questions about cancel culture, and, of course, diapers dot com. And while a lot of us here might’ve predicted some of the turns that unfolded over the six and a half ungodly hours of CEO-grilling, the one thing I was struck by were the real, tangible questions raised about all of our privacy.

Excerpt:

“We don’t use cookies.” — Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook [6:30:04]

Towards the six and a half hour mark (urgh), congresswoman Lucy McBath (D-GA) pointed out in Facebook’s days of yore, its privacy policy stated that the company “would not” use cookies to track and target its user base. She pointed out that language “is a statement about the future, and that was written in 2004.” She goes on to ask him point-blank if the company uses cookies to compile data on users, and Zuckerberg responded, saying “[his] understanding is no. We’re not using cookies to collect private information about people who use our services, and I believe we’ve upheld that commitment.”

So, once again, this is technically correct, but functionally it’s just utter bullshit.

Source: Facebook, Google’s CEO’s Three Biggest Flubs Before Congress

Obfuscation #Surveillance #Orwellian #Online #Privacy — How we can evade, protest, and sabotage today’s pervasive digital surveillance by deploying more data, not less—and why we should.

Mit Press — Summary (Protection Online)

How we can evade, protest, and sabotage today’s pervasive digital surveillance by deploying more data, not less—and why we should.

With Obfuscation, Finn Brunton and Helen Nissenbaum mean to start a revolution. They are calling us not to the barricades but to our computers, offering us ways to fight today’s pervasive digital surveillance—the collection of our data by governments, corporations, advertisers, and hackers. To the toolkit of privacy protecting techniques and projects, they propose adding obfuscation: the deliberate use of ambiguous, confusing, or misleading information to interfere with surveillance and data collection projects. Brunton and Nissenbaum provide tools and a rationale for evasion, noncompliance, refusal, even sabotage—especially for average users, those of us not in a position to opt out or exert control over data about ourselves. Obfuscation will teach users to push back, software developers to keep their user data safe, and policy makers to gather data without misusing it.

Brunton and Nissenbaum present a guide to the forms and formats that obfuscation has taken and explain how to craft its implementation to suit the goal and the adversary. They describe a series of historical and contemporary examples, including radar chaff deployed by World War II pilots, Twitter bots that hobbled the social media strategy of popular protest movements, and software that can camouflage users’ search queries and stymie online advertising. They go on to consider obfuscation in more general terms, discussing why obfuscation is necessary, whether it is justified, how it works, and how it can be integrated with other privacy practices and technologies.

Learn more here & grab the add-on: Obfuscation | The MIT Press
https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/obfuscation

Congress Just Temporarily Extended the Government’s Spying Powers

ACLU: Congress today temporarily extended the NSA’s spying powers that time and again have been used to violate our rights. Disturbingly, this three-month extension was snuck into a broader funding bill, forcing members of Congress to choose between extending this program and causing a government shutdown. The extension is an unnecessary lifeline to spying programs that are plagued with compliance violations, have no proven intelligence value, and violate our rights.

Under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, one of the spying powers extended, the government believes it has the right to collect our personal information merely if it is deemed relevant to a terrorism or counterintelligence investigation — a standard much lower than the Fourth Amendment’s probable cause warrant requirement. This can include virtually any business record, including mental health records, DNA information, tax returns, books, videos, call records, financial data, and much more. One of the government’s legal justifications for this power is its false claim that the Fourth Amendment doesn’t protect our information if it is stored or held by a third party such as Google, Facebook, Amazon, a hospital, or an accountant.

This legal argument is not only outdated — it’s absurd.

In today’s digital world, vast amounts of our most intimate data are held by third parties. Telephone carriers can track virtually everywhere we have been. Internet service providers log every website we visit. And tech companies have a record of every text or email we send. The records held by these companies can reveal how often we go to church, seek mental health treatment, or even purchase junk food.

Given this reality — and the NSA’s history of abusing Section 215 — this authority should not be reauthorized unless Congress can enact substantial and meaningful reforms to protect our rights.

NSA Surveillance Privacy and Surveillance National Security Secrecy Surveillance by Other Agencies

https://www.aclu.org/news/national-security/congress-just-temporarily-extended-the-governments-spying-powers/